Developed by an American chiropractor, the Infinity Saddle is like nothing I’ve ever ridden before. It presents a new innovative design, and promises to guarantee comfort and performance.

Founder Dr. Vince Marcel, a chiropractor, athlete and hobby cyclist, suffered with painful sores from a variety of saddles. So he decided to fix the problem, taking his knowledge of the human body, Dr. Marcel designed and developed the Infinity Saddle.

READ MORE AT: https://totalwomenscycling.com/mountain-biking/review-infinity-bike-seat

 

The N-Series Infinity Seat

The idea is simple: the saddle is intelligently designed with a fully recessed cut out, designed to relieve pressure on those sensitive areas. Its slightly concave shape cradles your bum, and the turned out outer edge allows for your sit bones to rest without that painful bruise feeling.

The good doctor took to the Kickstarter website to raise funds to develop his product for the cycling market. Securing $188,000 for funding – the target was only $25,000- the Infinity seat was born.

N-Series  – Tested

There are 3 types of Infinity saddle to choose from, but we tested the N-Series model, weighing just 210g.

The seat is a hard plastic material, only available in black, but with various options for the rails: Chrome, Copper, Gold and Black Chrome.

It’s a “one size fits all” system, but noted that a female between the heights of 5’0″ – 5’9″ should be totally satisfied with the seat. It’s a unisex design, because the cut out recess has no impact on gender anatomy, so for men, it’s suitable for heights of 5’2″ – 6’3″.

The Review

Slightly concave for a nested fit

With this odd looking shape of saddle, I decided to try it out over various routes, both cycle paths and off-road terrain.

Fixing the saddle to the bike was no problem, however there’s no measurement guide on the rails as you would usually find. This wasn’t a big problem for me, as I find that I adjust my saddle a lot, especially in the first ride.

After fixing the Infinity saddle to my bike, I tested it down at Pembrey Country park where there’s a good mixture of cycle paths and woodland off-road terrain.

“Wow”. That was my first reaction after the initial pedal strokes. It’s oddly comfortable and like no other saddle I’ve ever ridden. The concave shape acted as a supportive nest for my bum, and the cut-out shape meant there was no pressure squishing my under-carriage.

There’s a noticeable redistribution of weight with this saddle, and it’s enhanced by the wider shape of the back end. This wider shape and size means it’s not ideal for downhill’ing and all-mountain trail riding, purely for the reason that it’s quite wide so shifting your weight behind without obstruction, or rubbing, is more difficult.

After a couple of miles on the bike, I felt more comfortable in the areas I usually feel the pain, but I started to feel achiness in new areas of my sit bones. I found cycling had became more of a balancing act where my sit bones were perched on the saddle frame, but would slip on either side with my body movements.

Overall, I think this is a genius design for a comfortable saddle which limits sores, bruising and a multitude of genital unpleasantness you can suffer with conventional saddles. Though it may not be ideal for all MTB use, it’s great for commuting and even XC – where you maintain a more steady, planted position. All this said, I do think it may benefit from being available in more width sizes.

Pros:

  • Light
  • No under-carridge pressure
  • Cradle effect
  • For multi-discipline use
  • No break in period

Cons:

  • Too wide for downhill and some MTB riding
  • Balancing act with the sit bones

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